NEWS | Sept. 10, 2021

“To Meet the Enemy on Any Element”

By John Trowbridge, Kentucky National Guard Public Affairs Office

NOTE: This is a guest article from SFC(R) John Trowbridge. He's a Kentucky Guardsman and former Command Historian that has compiled information on this topic from a variety of sources which aren't cited here. For more information on where this information has originated, please contact Mr. Trowbridge at the following: john.m.trowbridge.nfg@mail.mil

On February 8, 1813, Oliver Hazard Perry was ordered to Sacket’s Harbor, New York, for duty on Lake Erie. Once he arrived at Erie, Pennsylvania, he began setting in motion his campaign on Lake Erie. Today, few Kentuckians know of the role Kentucky’s Militia played in Perry’s ultimate victory on September 10, 1813, at the Battle of Lake Erie.
 
U. S. Brig Niagara, off the Western Sister,
Head of Lake Erie, September 10th, 1813. 4 P. M.
 
Dear General—We have met the enemy; and they are ours: two ships, two brigs,
one schooner & one sloop. Yours, with great respect and esteem,
 
O. H. Perry.
 
This simple statement, immortalized in the annuals of United States Naval history, described to General William Henry Harrison, Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry’s victory against a superior British fleet on the waters of Lake Erie. This victory allowed Harrison’s force the freedom to maneuver around the lake without fear of attack from the British fleet, eventually leading to the victory at the Battle of Thames on October 5, 1813, effectively ending the fighting in the Old Northwest Territory during the War of 1812. 
 
Commodore Perry arrived off Sandusky Bay on the 16th of August 1813, with his newly constructed fleet. Perry was in need of Marines to man the fleet. He immediately requested from General Harrison a company of militia to act as marines. A call for volunteers was made among the militia commands in the area.
 
Camp Meigs August 27th 1813.
General Orders
 
The Commandants of Corps will immediately select from their respective commands all sailors and Seamen who will volunteer to serve on board of Commedore [sic] Perry’s Fleet for a short time and report to the Asst. A. Adgt. Genl.
 
Duncan McArthur
Brigd. Genl. N. W. Army Commandant
 
Early histories of the Battle of Lake Erie put the number of Kentucky militiamen volunteering to man the fleet at between 100 and 150. In his book, History of the Late War in the Western Country, Robert B. McAfee, described these “new marines” in the following words:
 
The Kentuckians, some of whom had probably never seen a ship before, relying on their skill to shoot, were thus ready to meet the enemy on any element, however novel the intended enterprise might be to them.  
 
The following is Perry’s official report of the battle, written in the days following the victory:
 
U. S. Schooner Ariel, Put-In-Bay,
13 September 1813.
 
In my last I informed you that we had captured the enemy’s fleet on this lake. I have now the honour to give you the most important particulars of the action.
 
On the morning of the 10th instant, at sun-rise, they were discovered from Put-in-Bay, when I lay at anchor with the squadron under my command. We got under weigh, the wind light at south-west, and stood for them. At 10 AM the wind hauled to south-east and brought us to windward; formed the line and bore up. At 15 minutes before 12, the enemy commenced firing; at five minutes before 12, the action commenced on our part. Finding their fire very destructive owing to their long guns, and its being mostly directed at the Lawrence, I made sail, and directed the other vessels to follow, for the purpose of closing with the enemy. Every brace and bowline being soon shot away, she became unmanageable, notwithstanding the great exertions of the sailing master. In this situation, she sustained the action upwards of two hours within canister distance, until every gun was rendered useless, and the greater part of her crew either killed or wounded. Finding she could no longer annoy the enemy, I left her in charge of Lieutenant Yarnall, who, I was convinced, from the bravery already displayed by him, would do what would comport with the honour of the flag. At half past two, the wind springing up, captain Elliot was enabled to bring his vessel, the Niagara, gallantly into close action. I immediately went on board of her, when he anticipated my wish by volunteering to bring the schooner which had been kept astern by the lightness of the wind, into close action. It was with unspeakable pain that I saw, soon after I got on board the Niagara, the flag of the Lawrence come down, although I was perfectly sensible that she had been defended to the last, and that to have continued to make a show of resistance would have been a wanton sacrifice of the remains of her brave crew. But the enemy was not able to take possession of her, and circumstances soon permitted her flag again to be hoisted. At 45 minutes past 2, the signal was made for “close action.” The Niagara being very little injured, I determined to pass through the enemy’s line, bore up and passed ahead of their two ships and a brig, giving a raking fire to them from the starboard guns, and to a large schooner and sloop, from the larboard side, at half pistol shot distance. The smaller vessels at this time having got within grape and canister distance, under the direction of captain Elliot, and keeping up a well-directed fire, the two ships, a brig, and a schooner surrendered, a schooner and sloop making a vain attempt to escape.
 
Those officers and men who were immediately under my observation, evinced the greatest gallantry, and I have no doubt that all others conducted themselves as became American officers and seamen.
 
Lieutenant Yarnall, first of the Lawrence, although several times wounded, refused to quit the deck.
 
Midshipman Forrest (doing duty as lieutenant) and sailing master Taylor, were of great assistance to me.
 
I have great pain in stating to you, the death of Lieutenant Brook of the marines, and midshipman Laub, both of the Lawrence, and midshipman John Clarke of the Scorpion: they were valuable and promising officers.
 
Mr. Hambleton, purser, who volunteered his services on deck, was severely wounded late in the action. Midshipmen Claxton and Swartout, of the Lawrence, were severely wounded.
 
On board the Niagara, Lieutenants Smith and Edwards, and midshipman Webster (doing duty as sailing master) behaved in a very handsome manner.
 
Captain Brevoort of the army, who acted as a volunteer in the capacity of a marine officer, on board that vessel, is an excellent and brave officer, and with his musketry, did great execution.
 
Lieutenant Turner, commanding the Caledonia, brought that vessel into action in the most able manner, and is an officer that in all situations, may be relied on.
 
The Ariel, Lieutenant Parker, and Scorpion, sailing master Champlin, were enabled to get early into action, and were of great service.
 
Captain Elliot speaks in the highest terms of Mr. Magrath, purser, who had been dispatched in a boat on service, previous to my getting on board the Niagara; and, being a seaman, since the action has rendered essential service in taking charge of one of the prizes. Of Captain Elliot, already so well known to the government, it would be almost superfluous to speak; in this action, he evinced his characteristic bravery and judgment; and, since the close of the action, has given me the most able and essential assistance.
 
I have the honour to enclose you a return of the killed and wounded, together with a statement of the relative force of the squadrons. The captain and first lieutenant of the Queen Charlotte, and first lieutenant of the Detroit, were killed. Captain Barclay, senior officer, and the commander of the Lady Prevost, severely wounded.
 
Their loss in killed and wounded, I have not yet been able to ascertain; it must, however, have been very great.
 
 
Very respectful, I have the honor to be sir, your most obedient servant,
 
O. H. PERRY
 
For the first time in history, a British fleet had been defeated and completely fallen into the hands of the enemy. The decisive factor was the American superiority. Perry’s victory had a decisive consequence in Upper Canada forcing the British to give up Detroit and conquest they had gained in 1812.
 
Statement of the Force of the British Squadron.
 
Ship Detroit -                          19 guns-1 on pivot and 2 howitzers
Queen Charlotte -                   17 guns, 1 do.
Schooner Lady Prevost -         13 do, 1 do.
Brig Hunter -                          10 do.
Sloop Little Belt -                   3 do.
Schooner Chippeway -            1 do. and 2 swivels 63 guns
 
Note—The Detroit is a new ship, very strongly built, and mounts long twenty-fours, eighteens, and twelves.
 
Statement of the Force of the United States’ Squadron.
 
Brig Lawrence -                      20 guns.
Niagara -                                20 do.  
Caledonia -                             3 do.
Schooner Ariel -                      4 do. (1 burst early in action)
Scorpion -                               2 do.
Somers -                                  2 do. and 2 swivels
Sloop Trippe -                         1 do.
Schooner Tygress -                  1 do.
Porcupine -                             1 do. 54 guns
 
Note – The exact number of the enemy’s force, has not been ascertained, but I
have good reason to believe that it exceeded ours, by nearly 100 men.
 
Following the battle and repairs to his ships, Perry ferried 2,500 American soldiers to Detroit, while General Harrison moved across country with 1,000 mounted troops. Detroit and Amherstberg had been abandoned by the British. General Harrison caught the retreating British-First Nations army in early October and defeated them in the decisive Battle of the Thames. The United States controlled Lake Erie for the remainder of the war. Thus, the war in the Old Northwest Territory was essentially over and the British presence was largely eliminated in the area.  
 
After the war, various attempts were made to honor and commemorate Perry’s victory without success. During one of the failed attempts to construct a monument it was discovered that here in Kentucky there were still living participants of the battle. On December 17, 1859 the Kentucky Legislature filed a joint resolution to honor the remaining Kentuckians that had served with Perry on Lake Erie.  
 
Be it resolved by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, That the Governor of the Commonwealth be, and is hereby, authorized and directed to procure suitable gold medals, with appropriate inscriptions and devises, and in the name of the State of Kentucky to present to each of the surviving officers and soldiers of the Kentucky volunteers who were present and participated in the memorable engagement between the American and British naval forces on Lake Erie, the 10th of September, 1813, as a token of the grateful recollection in which the people of the State hold their brave and patriotic services on that day, and the imperishable renown which that brilliant victory achieved for the common country.
 
However, the minting and presentation of these medals was put on hold until after the Civil War (1861-1865). Finally, in 1867, fifty-four years after the Battle of Lake Erie, four Kentuckians were awarded medals, James Artus, John Norris, John Tucker, and William T. Taliaferro. It was soon discovered that two additional Kentuckians who had fought in the battle were still living, Samuel Hatfield of Floyd County and Ezra Younglove, who was then living in Monroe, Michigan. Legislation was passed and medals presented to both of the old soldiers. Dr. Taliaferro would later relate to Alfred Thomas Goodman, an official with the Western Reserve Historical Society that in the winter of 1867-68, a seventh gold medal was presented to another Kentucky survivor of the battle by the name of Manhatten. A search of State records did not reflect this statement.  
 
The vision of a Perry Monument finally came to fruition in 1912. Located in Put-in-Bay, Ohio, Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial commemorates Perry’s Lake Erie victory and acts as the symbol of the disarmament of the U. S.–Canadian border.  
 
Additionally, Kentucky honored Oliver Hazard Perry by naming the City of Hazard (1854) in Perry County (1821), as well as the City of Perryville (1817), in this honor.  
Today, a full-size reproduction of the Niagara, the ship on which the largest number of Kentuckians served, once again sails the waters of Lake Erie. On September 10, 1988, during the 175th anniversary of the battle, the Niagara was launched, she serves as a sailing school vessel, part of the Erie Maritime Museum in Erie, Pennsylvania.  
 
How many Kentucky militiamen served aboard Perry’s Fleet? Early histories of the Battle of Lake Erie put the number at 100 to 150. In his article entitled, “Kentuckians in the Battle of Lake Erie,” which appeared in the September 1911 issue of The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Anderson Chenault Quisenberry tells the story of Perry’s victory on the lake and from various sources attempted to compile a listing of the Kentucky soldiers who fought in Perry’s fleet. Mr. Quisenberry states in the article that he contacted the Navy Department at Washington for a list of the Kentuckians who fought aboard the ships of Perry’s fleet. He received a list with 105 names which he included in the article.
 
We may never know exactly how many Kentucky militiamen served aboard Perry’s ships, it is hoped this updated listing of Kentucky soldiers who served aboard Perry’s squadron and help win the decisive victory on Lake Erie will better serve future generations.
 

 
Roster of Kentuckians Who Served Aboard Perry’s Squadron
September 10, 1813.
 
Published numbers of the Kentuckians who participated in Perry’s victory on Lake Erie range from 150 to a possible 68. Anderson C. Quisenberry’s list from the Navy Historical Office indicated there were a total of 105 Kentucky Soldiers aboard Perry’s fleet. Taking the Navy’s list of 105 along with Samuel Hamilton’s prize money list, Kentucky Adjutant General’s Report on the Soldiers of the War of 1812, home of record information and other documents and records, we come up with completely different numbers. Additionally, one has to consider possible errors in record keeping at the time. Although numbers differ drastically, as to the Kentucky Militia’s involvement in the Battle of Erie, it does not diminish the significant role these soldiers, turned sailors and marines, played in this pivotal battle in the War of 1812.
 
Name: Rank/Unit Assigned:   Ship:    Remark(s):
  1. Anderson, John:        Unknown, Unknown: Niagara: Not listed on prize money list.
  2. Anderson, Thomas: Private, Captain Swearington’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Ariel: $214.89 prize money, 26 April 1815.
  3. Artus/Artis, James: Second Sergeant, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: WIA: $447.39 prize money, 08 November 1814. Recipient of Gold Medal presented by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to living participants of the Battle of Lake Erie.
  4. Bailey/Baly/Baley, James: Private, CPT Moore’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  5. Bates/Batis/Battice, John: Private, Captain Holt’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, July 1814.
  6. Beckley/Bikley/Buckley, Joseph: Orderly Sergeant, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron, Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $447.39 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  7. Berry, Joseph: Corporal, Captain Martin’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $447.39 prize money, 21 November 1814.
  8. Biggs, Josiah: Private, Captain Martin’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 25 December 1814.
  9. Bland, Micajah/McCager: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  10. Blaney/Bleany, David L.: Private, Captain Cairns’ Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 13 February 1815.
  11. Bonner, William: Private, Captain Cushing’s Co., 2nd US Artillery Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 28 November 1814.
  12. Bowman, Gilbert: Private, Captain Swearington’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Ariel: WIA/DOW: His widow re ceived $214.89 prize money, 13 February 1815.
  13. Bradford, Thomas H.: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214. 89 prize money, 20 January 1815.
  14. Bromwell, John: Private, Captain Gill’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 20 January 1815.
  15. Brown, John: Corporal, Captain Holder’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $447.39 prize money, November 1814.
  16. Bryant, David: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  17. Burnett, Griffen/Griffin: Private, Captain Stockton’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 31 January 1816.
  18. Burns, Francis: Private, Captain Swearington’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Ariel: $214.89 prize money, 22 April 1815.
  19. Cavill/Cavalie/Cavaller, Thomas: Private, Captain Elliott’s Co., 19th US Infantry Regiment: Porcupine: $214.89 prize money, 19 April 1815.
  20. Chetwood/Cheetwood/Chitwood, John R.: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 31 August 1815.
  21. Clifford, John: Private, Captain Swearington’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  22. Coats/Couts, Aaron: Private, Captain Gist’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  23. Coburn, James W.: Lieutenant, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Ohio: $1,214.29 prize money, 20 February 1818.
  24. Cochran, London: Private, Captain Thomas’ Co., Pennsylvania Artillery: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, July 1814.
  25. Cochran, Samuel: Private, Captain Records’ Co., 147th Pennsylvania Militia: Niagara: WIA: His father, Alexander received his $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  26. Colrick/Collrick/Clerich, Charles: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 12 September 1814.
  27. Cook, Henry: Private, Captain Rodgers’ Co., 24th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, January 1815.
  28. Cunningham, Ebenezer: Private, Captain Cairn’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Lawrence: $214.89 prize money, 11 September 1814.
  29. Davidson, Joseph: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 18 September 1814.
  30. Decker, John: Private, Captain Van Horn’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 20 December 1814.
  31. Delaney/Delany, Joseph: Private, Captain Bradford’s Co., 17th US Infantry: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  32. Denton, John: Private, Captain Daniel’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  33. Devault/Devalt, Isaac: Private, Captain Martin’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 12 September 1814.
  34. Drake, George W.: Private, Captain Campbell’s Co., 24th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, 25 September 1814.
  35. Duncanson, John B. Dunkerson, Washington: Private, Captain Gist’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 09 December 1814. W. H. Perrin makes the statement that Dunkerson was in the hottest of the fight, and when the colors had been shot away, he climbed into the rigging and re-nailed them on the mast, in the face of a murderous fire from the enemy.
  36. Ellis, Levi: Sergeant, Captain Bradford’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $447.39 prize money, 11 January 1815.
  37. Ellis, William: Private, Captain Lowry’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, July 1814.
  38. Flagg, David: Private, Captain Moore’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  39. Flaherty, Sim/Fleharty, Sem: Private, Captain Gill’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 14 January 1815.
  40. George, John H.: Private, Captain Puthuff’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 1815.
  41. Gordon, Lewis: Private, Lieutenant Brooks’, Detachment of US Marines: Porcupine: $214.89 prize money, 21 November 1814.
  42. Green, Isaac: Private, Captain Cairns’ Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: WIA: $214.89 prize money, 26 November 1814.
  43. Hall, John: Private, Captain Sanderson’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, 24 July 1815.
  44. Harland/Harlan/Harlon, Jesse: Private, Lieutenant Brooks’ Detachment of US Marines: Lawrence: KIA: His father John Harlan received $214.89 prize money, 12 August 1817.
  45. Harrington, Charles: Private, Captain Bradford’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Lawrence: WIA: $214.89 prize money, 11 September 1814.
  46. Harrington/Herington, Harvey C.: Private, Captain Martin’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, 21 November 1814.
  47. Harten/Harter, Charles: Private, Captain Lowry’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 18 September 1814.
  48. Hatfield/Hadfield, Samuel: Private, Captain Mosby’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 10 January 1815. Pension SC-20257.73. The last recipient of Gold Medal presented by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to living participants of the Battle of Lake Erie.
  49. Heddleson/Heddelson, John: Third Lieutenant, Captain Stockton’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Ohio:
$1,214.29 prize money, 24 April 1816.
  1. Henry, William: Private, Captain Rodgers’ Co., 147th Pennsylvania Militia Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  2. Hickman, David: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814. 
  3. Hocker, William: Private, Unknown: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  4. Hockersmith/Hockensmith, William: Private, Captain Moore’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  5. Holbert/Halbert, Nathan: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers:
  6. : $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814. 
  7. Holiday/Holliday, _____: Private, Captain Gill’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, November 1814.
  8. Howard, Eli: Private, Captain Magowan’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: Records indicate that he didn’t receive any prize money.
  9. Jarvis, Parker: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814. 
  10. Johnson, Abraham: Private, Captain Gill’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money,
November 1814.
  1. Johnson, Philip: Private, Captain Gray’s Co., 24th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 19 April 1815.
  2. Kelley/Kelly, John C.: Private, Captain Bradford’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Lawrence: KIA: Not listed on prize list.
  3. Killey Ezra/Ezrea Kelly/Kelley: Private, Captain Cairn’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 11 September 1814.
  4. King, Conrad: Private, Captain Swearington’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Ariel: $214.89 prize money, 15 November 1815.
  5. Little, David: Corporal, Captain Swearington’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Porcupine: $447.39 prize money, 23 December 1814.
  6. Ludd, John: Private, Unknown: Lawrence: $214.89 prize money, 11 January 1815.
  7. Lynam/Lynum/Linum, Charles: Private, Captain Magowan’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89, 16 May 1815.
  8. Maltzbocker, Daniel/David Metzenbach/Metzenbough: Private, Captain Tipton’s Co., 147th Pennsylvania Militia Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, July 1814.
  9. Manhatten, _____: Private, Unknown Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: Possibly WIA: Records indicate that he did not receive any prize money.
  10. Marless/Maless, John: Private: Trippe: WIA. This individual was actually John Nailes (see listing below). $214.89 prize money, January 1815.
  11. Martin, John: Private, Unknown: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, 21 February 1816.
  12. Mason, Sanford/Sandford A.: Sergeant, Captain Stockton’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: WIA: $447.39 prize money, 16 May 1816. Pension Old War IF#25642.
  13. McCarty, John: Private, Captain Martin’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  14. McCord, Alexander: Private, Captain Sanderson’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, March 1815.
  15. McCoy, John: Private, Unknown: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  16. McGarney/McGarvey, Moses: Private, Captain Sanderson’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 27 February 1815.
  17. McHowell/Howell, John: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers:
  18. : $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  19. McKenney, Samuel: Private, Captain Records’ Co., 147th Pennsylvania Militia Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  20. McManomy/McManomey/McManimy, George: Private, Captain Mosby’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: WIA: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815. Pension Old War IF#25675.
  21. Miller, Frederick: Private, Captain Stockton’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  22. Mitchell, Richard: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 30 January 1816. 
  23. Morris, Joseph: Private, Captain Magowan’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  24. Nailes/Malass/Marless, John: Private, Captain Bradford’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: WIA: No prize money was issued for anyone with the name Nailes.
  25. Nelson, William: Private, Captain Payne’sCo., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 20 March 1816. 
  26. Norris, John: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814. Pension Old War IF#25714. Recipient of Gold Medal presented by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to living participants of the Battle of Lake Erie.
  27. Osburn, John: Private, Captain Moore’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  28. Parker, Garland: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  29. Parker, Rowland T.: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: Records indicate that he did not receive any prize money.
  30. Perkins, Isaac: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: WIA: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  31. Perkins, William B.: Private, Captain Stockton’s 19th US Infantry Regiment: Lawrence: WIA: $214.89 prize money, 20 March 1815. Pension Old War IF#17034. 
  32. Pomeroy, Joseph: Private, Captain Chunn’s Co., 19th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, July 1814.
  33. Redman, Joseph: Private, Captain Graham’s Co., 1st US Rifle Regiment: Unknown: Possibly WIA: Name does not appear on prize list.
  34. Reed, William: Private, Captain Martin’s Co., 27th Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 22 February 1815.
  35. Reems/Rumas/Ream/Reams, John: Private, Captain Stockton’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: WIA: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815. Pension Old War IF#47904.
  36. Roberts, Henry: Private, Captain Elliott’s Co. 19th US Infantry Regiment: Porcupine: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  37. Rogers/Rodgers, John: Private, Captain Kesling’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Porcupine: $214.89 prize money, 06 October 1815.
  38. Roof, Samuel: Private, Captain Kesling’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Porcupine: $214.89 prize money, 20 March 1815.
  39. Rush, Garrett: Private, Captain Martin’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 09 February 1815.
  40. Scott, Andrew B.: Corporal, Captain Gist’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: WIA: $447.39 prize money, July 1814.
  41. Sergeant, Hosea/Hosey: Private, Captain Hunter’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Lawrence: $214.89 prize money, 30 December 1816. In a newspaper article in 1860, Sergeant stated that he was stationed at gun #9, when it was disabled. He was standing near the halyards when Perry disembarked in the first cutter, he claims to have helped haul down Perry’s “Don’t Give Up the Ship” flag and personally handed it to Perry.
  42. Smith, William: Private, Captain Swearington’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Ariel: $214.89 prize money, 17 September 1814.
  43. Smothers/Smithers, Charles: Private, Captain Rodgers’ Co., 24th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814.
  44. Stockton, George: Captain, Captain Stockton’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Ohio: $2,295.00 prize money, 06 March 1816. Prior to the battle Stockton returned to Fort Seneca for clothes for his men and did not return to the ship until the action was over.
  45. Swift, Marlen/Martin Sniff: Private, Captain Cairns’ Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Trippe: $214.89 prize money, 12 September 1814.
  46. Taliaferro, William/Thornton Tolliver: Corporal, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $447.39 prize money, 08 November 1814. Recipient of Gold Medal presented by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to living participants of the Battle of Lake Erie.
  47. Tate, Henry: Private, Captain Magowan’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  48. Thompson, John: Private, Captain Magowan’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  49. Thurman, Samuel: Private, Lieutenant Richards’ Co., 24th US Infantry Regiment: Porcupine: $214.89 prize money, 09 September 1817.
  50. Trapnall, Joshua: Private, Captain Bradford’s Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: WIA/DOW: His widow, Elizabeth, received $214.89 prize money, 07 June 1814.
  51. Tucker, John: Private, Captain Payne’s Co., Ball’s Squadron Light Dragoons, US Volunteers: Caledonia: $214.89 prize money, 08 November 1814. Recipient of Gold Medal presented by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to living participants of the Battle of Lake Erie.
  52. Tuft/Tuff/Tufft, Thomas: Private, Captain Gray’s Co., 24th US Infantry Regiment: Lawrence: WIA: $214.89 prize money, 25 September 1814.
  53. Vantruce, Frederick: Private, Captain Stockton’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 16 May 1815.
  54. Vanway, Lewis: Private, Captain Sanderson’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $214.89 prize money, 22 February 1815.
  55. Webster, Henry: Private, Captain Lowry’s Co., 28th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 21 November 1814.
  56. Webster, William: Corporal, Captain Gill’s Co., 27th US Infantry Regiment: Tigress: $447.39 prize money, 20 March 1815.
  57. Welch/Welsh, Edward: Private, Unknown Co., 17th US Infantry Regiment: Scorpion: $214.89 prize money, 06 November 1814.
  58. West, Freeman: Private, Unknown Co., Pennsylvania Militia Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, July 1814.
  59. Williams, Abner: Private, Lieutenant Brooks’ Detachment of Marines: Lawrence: KIA: His father received $214.89 prize money, July 1814.
  60. Wright, Alexander: Private, Captain Kesling’s Co., 26th US Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $214.89 prize money, 07 December 1815.
  61. Younglove, Ezra: Second Corporal, Captain Gist’s Co., 28th Infantry Regiment: Niagara: $447.39 prize money, 18 September 1814. Recipient of Gold Medal presented by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to living participants of the Battle of Lake Erie.
 
Kentucky Casualties – Roll of Honor
 
Killed in Action (KIA): 3.
Harland, Jesse (Lawrence).
Kelley, John C. (Lawrence).
Williams, Abner (Lawrence).
 
Died of Wounds (DOW): 2.
Bowman, Gilbert (Ariel).
Trapnall, Joshua (Niagara).
 
Wounded in Action (WIA): 14.
Artus, James (Caledonia).
Cochran, Samuel (Niagara).
Green, Isaac (Trippe).
Harrington, Charles (Lawrence).
McManomy George (Niagara).
Manhatten, _____ (Niagara).
Marless, John (Trippe).
Mason, Sanford A. (Niagara).
Perkins, Isaac (Caledonia).
Perkins, William B. (Lawrence).
Redman, Joseph (Unknown).
Reems, John (Niagara).
Scott, Andrew B. (Niagara).
Tuft, Thomas (Lawrence).
West, Freeman (Niagara).
 
Total:    19.